Construction sites, of any kind, offer a variety hazards, often involving heavy equipment. However, probably one of the most dangerous types of construction accident has to be the ones involving road construction workers. After all, not only do Illinois road workers have to contend with all the problems associated with any construction site, but they also have to deal with oncoming traffic, often whizzing by at high speeds.

Unfortunately for four Illinois road workers, they learned how dangerous the roads can be the hard way. The four had been going out on a highway to set up for construction in the morning when they were struck by a car.

One of the men died, whereas the other three men sustained serious injuries. For one person who was seriously injured, he feels fortunate to have survived after seeing photos of the accident scene. Because of the accident, he spent three weeks in the ICU and currently cannot walk.

For the surviving workers and for the surviving family of the man who was killed in the crash, they are, as one could expect, devastated by the accident. For the widow of the man, she is struggling to grasp the fact that her husband and the father of her three young children is gone. Now it will be up to her to support and nurture them. Furthermore, one of the workers who was injured was related to the man who died.

As the surviving workers and surviving family of the fatal construction accident victim recover from the pain that they now have, they have launched a crusade to raise awareness of work zone safety for vehicles. In the meantime, as they go through this difficult period, they should be comforted in knowing that it may be possible for the surviving workers to receive workers’ compensation benefits to help them through their medical expenses and time off of work. As for the family that lost its father, workers’ compensation may include death benefits that they can use as they mourn the loss of their loved one.

Source: KDSK-TV News, “Benefit to be held for highway workers struck on I-64,” Brandie Piper, Aug. 17, 2012